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A Divine Appointment, a Kingdom Investment

Okay, first of all, I am the organizer of a charity (which can be found here: The Sudan Project. So, this spammer actually did a little bit of homework before spamming me, because it makes mention of my 'charity/ministry'. Let's take a look:


DEAR IN CHRIST,

CALVARY GREETINGS IN THE NAME OF OUR LORD JESUS CHRIST. I AM MR. [SPAMMER], A MEMBER OF DOVE MINISTRY INC. DURING A PRAYER AND FASTING SESSION IN MY MINISTRY I DEMANDED FROM OUR LORD JESUS CHRIST TO GIVE ME THE OPPORTUNITY TO REDEEM MY LIFE AND PURIFY WHAT REMAINS OF MY WEALTH. GOD DELIVELY REVEALED TO ME TO INVEST IN HIS KINGDOM THROUGH YOU AND YOUR MINISTRY /CHARITY ORGANISATION. YOU SHOULD IMMIDIATLY CONTACT ME WITH MY E-MAIL ADDRESS. THE WAY JESUS MINISTERED TO ME, THE FUNDS WILL BE EXPANDED.
REMAIN BLESSED.
DEACON [spammername]

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Faites un voeu et puis Voila ! www.voila.fr


Now, let's analyze this briefly.

1. First, did you notice that, while Jesus apparently gave him a 'divine revelation' about my ministry, the Lord forgot to mention my name. Not only that, but the 'typical' Christian greeting would be 'DEAR BROTHER IN CHRIST'. Apparently no one mentioned to the spammer whether I was a BROTHER or a SISTER!

2. There is a DOVE MINISTRY INC., which you can find on the internet very easily, and it makes no mention whatsoever of DEACON [SPAMMER].

3. This is important. Always check the 'To:' line in the email message. It should be your own email address. In this case, the 'To:' line was the spammer's own email address. What does this tell you? It tells you that the good Deacon has sent this message out to multiple people, and has blind carbon copied each address. So I guess Jesus told him to donate his wealth to a variety of ministries--not just mine.

4. Finally, you should always look at the domain of the sending email address. In this case, the sending domain was 'voila.fr'. France? Dove Ministry Inc is located in the US, so ask yourself why someone would use an out-of-country email provider to contact me. Perhaps he's afraid of fraud claims in his home country.

Do you think?

This scam is very similar to the "Nigerian Millionaire" scam. Eventually, at some point, you will be asked to make a 'good faith gesture' by providing your contact with a credit card number, or access to your bank account, so the transfer of cash can be made.

Only...which direction will the cash be transfered?

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